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Capital and Corporal Punishment in Anglo-Saxon England Jay Paul Gates

Capital and Corporal Punishment in Anglo-Saxon England

Medios de pago

    Capital and Corporal Punishment in Anglo-Saxon England

    Editorial: Boydell & Brewer

    Idioma: Inglés

    ISBN: 9781782042983

    Formatos: PDF (con DRM de Adobe)

    Compatibles con: Windows, Mac, iOS, Android & eReaders

    $24.99

    Medios de pago
      Capital and Corporal Punishment in Anglo-Saxon England Jay Paul Gates

      Capital and Corporal Punishment in Anglo-Saxon England

      Medios de pago

        Capital and Corporal Punishment in Anglo-Saxon England

        Editorial: Boydell & Brewer

        Idioma: Inglés

        ISBN: 9781782042983

        Formatos: PDF (con DRM de Adobe)

        Compatibles con: Windows, Mac, iOS, Android & eReaders

        $24.99

        Medios de pago
          Sinopsis
          Anglo-Saxon authorities often punished lawbreakers with harsh corporal penalties, such as execution, mutilation and imprisonment. Despite their severity, however, these penalties were not arbitrary exercises of power. Rather, they were informed by nuanced philosophies of punishment which sought to resolve conflict, keep the peace and enforce Christian morality. The ten essays in this volume engage legal, literary, historical, and archaeological evidence to investigate the role of punishment in Anglo-Saxon society. Three dominant themes emerge in the collection. First is the shift from a culture of retributive feud to a system of top-down punishment, in which penalties were imposed by an authority figure responsible for keeping the peace. Second is the use of spectacular punishment to enhance royal standing, as Anglo-Saxon kings sought to centralize and legitimize their power. Third is the intersection of secular punishment and penitential practice, as Christian authorities tempered penalties for material crime with concern for the souls of the condemned. Together, these studies demonstrate that in Anglo-Saxon England, capital and corporal punishments were considered necessary, legitimate, and righteous methods of social control. Jay Paul Gates is Assistant Professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in The City University of New York; Nicole Marafioti is Assistant Professor of History and co-director of the Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. Contributors: Valerie Allen, Jo Buckberry, Daniela Fruscione, Jay Paul Gates, Stefan Jurasinski, Nicole Marafioti, Daniel O'Gorman, Lisi Oliver, Andrew Rabin, Daniel Thomas.
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