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Music, Language and Autism Adam Ockelford

Music, Language and Autism

$103.00

Medios de pago

    Music, Language and Autism

    Editorial: Jessica Kingsley Publishers

    Idioma: Inglés

    ISBN: 9780857004284

    Formatos: ePub (con DRM de Adobe)

    Compatibles con: Windows, Mac, iOS, Android & eReaders

    $103.00

    Medios de pago
      Music, Language and Autism Adam Ockelford

      Music, Language and Autism

      $103.00

      Medios de pago

        Music, Language and Autism

        Editorial: Jessica Kingsley Publishers

        Idioma: Inglés

        ISBN: 9780857004284

        Formatos: ePub (con DRM de Adobe)

        Compatibles con: Windows, Mac, iOS, Android & eReaders

        $103.00

        Medios de pago
          Sinopsis
          Children with autism often have an intense natural musicality. This book explains how music and language 'work' as systems of communication, and why music holds such a fascination for many young people on the autism spectrum. There are strategies for showing how music can be used to support language development and even substitute for verbal communication. Exploring the progression from a young child's intuitive engagement with music, to using it as a scaffold for communication, socialisation and understanding, the book illustrates, through the use of detailed case studies, how music nurtures a sense of self and provides a positive outlet to express inner thoughts and feelings without resorting to challenging or even destructive behaviours.Presenting an innovative approach to the use of music with people on the autism spectrum, this book will be a fascinating resource for speech and language therapists, music therapists, occupational therapists, teachers, teaching assistants, educational psychologists, carers and parents of people with autism.
          Acerca de Adam Ockelford

          Adam Ockelford was born in Nottingham in 1959, grew up on the Isle of Wight, and, when he left school, studied at the Royal Academy of Music in London. It was at this time, in the late 1970s, that he first started working with blind children, including those with additional disabilities. He was fascinated by just how musical many of them seemed to be. Trying to understand how these young people could 'hear' and understand music so effectively led him to develop a theory of how music makes sense - not just to them, but to all of us - a theory for which he was awarded a PhD by London University in 1993, and that has since been published in a number of academic journals and books. But Adam believes that theories are of little value unless they're put into practice, and he continues to work with a number of the young people - now adults - whom he first started to teach over twenty years ago, including Derek. Adam is Professor of Music at Roehampton University and the Institute of Education, London; Secretary of the Society for Education, Music and Psychology Research; Chair of 'Soundabout', an Oxford-based charity that supports music provision children with complex needs; and founder of The AMBER Trust, which provides bursaries for blind and partially sighted children to have music lessons.

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